Art Crawl for the Coldest Days

Grab a cuppa and check out the best art online. Click each image for a web gallery of work by that artist.

Let’s get started.

Who Does America Belong To? asked artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh in her popular murals in New York and across the country. The featured image below is one of them.

Oklahoma is Black, wheatpaste mural on OKC’s 23rd St, 2016

Now this Oklahoma artist is coming home for a show at the Oklahoma Contemporary, Oklahoma is Black. It might be the hottest exhibit in OKC this year. Fazlalizadeh says she will highlight, “the faces and voices of a people navigating deep-rooted racist environments while also creating beauty and culture in their daily lives.” I love her portraits. If you are anywhere near OKC or have sky-miles, you HAVE to check out the exhibit opening on the 21st. Click the preview image below for a gallery of her awesome portraits online:

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Najva, oil on canvas 2016

Next, the Dallas Museum of Art is featuring Jonas Wood, a fave. His paintings make me happy, yes, you:re right about the Hockney influence. His colors laugh, but I can’t get enough of the texture in this white one. Check out the DMA’s mini-gallery of highlights from the exhibit by clicking the shed below, then drop by the museum March 24 through July. It’ll be warmer then, promise.

Jonas Wood, Snowscape with Barn, 2017, oil and acrylic on canvas, Dallas Museum of Art, TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art Fund, Courtesy the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, Photographer credit: Brian Forrest

You’ll have to go to New York to view Constantin Brancusi sculptures in person, through February 28th at MOMA. But we won’t hold that against them. I love his unreal creations that help you see the subjects differently, like an artist sees. Click the preview image below to watch a film, sort of about the exhibit featuring some of his sculptures set to spiffy French music from Brancusi’s personal collection.

Constantin Brancusi, Mlle Pogany version I, 1913 (after a marble of 1912), Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest
© Succession Brancusi – All rights reserved

And last, an artist forbidden to paint. Quah Ah (Tonita Peña) defied convention, captured her Pueblo’s forbidden dances and MADE A DIFFERENCE. Click below to read her inspiring story in my feature for Western Art & Architecture. Then pick up the magazine. It’s GORGEOUS.

And it looks WARM.

HOPI CORN DANCE” | GOUACHE OVER GRAPHITE ON WOVE PAPER | 14 X 22 INCHES | C. 1935
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON, D.C., CORCORAN COLLECTION (GIFT OF AMELIA E. WHITE)